Research at Lancashire Archives 27th January 2017

Reproduced by permission of Lancashire Archives. DP 386-32 (002).jpg
Reproduced by permission of Lancashire Archives.
DP 386-32 (002).jpg

Two members of the Friends visited Lancashire Archives to research into the area of Craggs on Pendle Hill where the archaeology group have carried out several digs over the past few years. We didn’t find a great deal to further our research but we did discover some fascinating information.

In the 1296 accounts of the vaccaries in Goldshaw Booth there were 11 boothmen or keepers. The names of the vaccaries (stock farms, also known as booths) were not recorded. By 1418 the chief steward devised the vaccaries of Over and Nether Goldshaw to Sir Richard Radcliffe. Richard Shireburn had the Craggs in Pendle near Goldlea at 20s. against the old rent of 13s 4d.

By 1463 well-known local family names such as Nutter and Robinson were appearing and these families appeared in the township for hundreds of years whilst others quickly disappeared. Nutter families are still in Goldshaw Booth today.

DP 386-5 Whalley Abbey (002).jpg Reproduced by permission of Lancashire Archives.
DP 386-5 Whalley Abbey (002).jpg
Reproduced by permission of Lancashire Archives.

It is surprising how different areas show connecting threads, Stainscomb (standing between two spurs of the Craggs) was sold by Nicholas Stevenson of Admergill in the early 18th C to John Haydock of Heysandforth (Burnley) then conveyed to James Mathews curate of Burnley – presumably St Peter’s church.

Early records show oxen, cows, bulls, heifers, calves and a surprising number of horses and yearlings between 1296 and 1305. Sheep appeared later. This was long before the reign of Edward III and the Black Prince and John of Gaunt, whose names are mentioned in connection to the Manor at Ichtenhill.

If you are interested in the origin of nursery rhymes, “Little Boy Blue” – could have been paid 1s 6d for ‘watching the corn’ (as John Parker of Ichtenhill recorded in the computus between 30th September 1304 and the same date in 1305). Maybe his wages were deducted for falling asleep and letting the sheep in the meadow and cows in the corn? Catching folding mares and colts three times, marking foals and buying halters was charged at 7s 6d, which seems to be a ‘right princely sum’.

We had a very enjoyable day, the staff were very friendly and helpful, there is free parking at the door and a room for breaks. It is well worth a visit, they have a true wealth of resources.

We intend to do further research at the end of February/March – welcome one welcome all to join us. Please contact Gayle Wray at gw@gayle-victoria.com if you are interested in joining us.   Finally one gem of a find;

Market Charter for Euxton by Edward I in 1301′

Reproduced by permission of Lancashire Archives. DP 405-1 Euxton market charter (003).jpg
Reproduced by permission of Lancashire Archives.
DP 405-1 Euxton market charter (003).jpg

Charter Edward I to Robert of Eukeston – weekly market each Tuesday and annual fair each St. Barnabas’ day; also free warren in his demesne lands, in manor of Eukeston. Witn. John of Warenne, Earl of Surrey; Ralph of Montehermeri, Earl of Gloucester and Hertford; Adomar of Valence; John of St. John, Senior; Hugh le Despenser; John of Segrave; Walter of Beauchamp, seneschal of our hospital, etc. Given at Linlithgow 2 Dec.1301