This walk is being held during British Archaeology Week. Its for everyone interested in the delightful hamlet of Wycoller and the surrounding area and the buildings and history of the place.

Apparently the hamlet has its origins in the 10th Century, its main features are the pack horse bridge and Wycoller Hall. There is also an ancient ‘clapper’ bridge and a clam bridge thought to be around 6,000 years old ie Neolithic in origin.

Clapper Bridge, Wycoller.

There are a number of very interesting 17th Century houses and cottages and a huge aisled barn thought to date to 1630. There are some interesting boundary stones in the area, which are thought to be medieval vaccary walls.

Packhorse Bridge, Wycoller

Come suited and booted for the weather and conditions. Mainly flat walking with some uneven ground, possibly a stile or two.

Walk led by David Morris who is an expert on vernacular buildings.

Meet 1 30pm at the Car Park.  For further information contact info@foph.co.uk.

Banner Image: Laitre Hills Cottage, Wycoller

Come with us to visit something unique, the last surviving 19th Century steam powered weaving mill in the world.    This Grade 1 listed building has a mighty steam engine re named Peace after ww1 armistice, originally it was named Prudence and had a coal fired boiler. The mill is deemed to be of national importance.

Learn about pirn winding and drawing in. There are 308 looms in the shed  at present, originally there were over 900. All the looms were bought from two Burnley companies and have not been replaced.    Cloth was taken by horse and cart and railway to the finishers, for dyeing and bleaching. Only in 1910 was the horse and cart replaced by steam powered lorries.

Attribution: Journal of Victorian Culture’ web site. Courtesy of Stephen Irwin.

Weavers were paid by piecework; a good four-loom weaver was paid 24 shillings a week, only slightly less than a tackler. Harle Syke workers had always been paid slightly below the list, which management explained as being due to the carriage costs to Burnley. In August 1915 there was a strike that lasted for several weeks triggered by this injustice.

The mill was finally closed as a working enterprise due to financial reasons in March 1982. It was closed by Lancashire Musems Service but has now re opened.

Cost around £3. For further info contact us at info@foph.co.uk.

Meet at 1 30pm at the Museum entrance off Queen St. Harle Syke, Burnley. BB10  2HX

Banner Image:Journal of Victorian Culture web site. Courtesy of Stephen Irwin.

MAY

Sunday 1st             Friends Open Day. Free to members only.

Saturday 7th         Pendle Archaeology Group(PAG) Field Walk  1 30pm

Tuesday 10th        Trip to Himalayan Sculpture Garden near Ripon

Thursday 19th      The Rylstone Bronze Age Log Coffin Burial and its Regional Significance.

Speaker: Dr Roger Martlew

JUNE

Wednesday 8th    Visit to Queen St Mill. 1 30pm.  Cost around £3.

Saturday 18th       PAG Excavation. Contact info@foph for more details or to join in.

JULY

Saturday 23rd      Walk around Wycoller. Meet 1 30pm in the Car Park. British Archaeology Week

AUGUST

Saturday 13th      Walk around Barnoldswick. Meet in the town square 1 30pm.

Saturday 28th     Garden Event.  To be confirmed.

SEPTEMBER

Saturday 10th     PAG: Survey of an upstanding building 10 30 – 3pm

Sunday 11th        Heritage Week.  Visit to Heyroyd Colne. 1 30pm. A multi-period

Palladian property.     Members only.

Tuesday 20th     Talk. 2pm. The Fourteen Incredible Freemen of Colne. Speaker: Geoff Crambie

OCTOBER

Saturday 8th      PAG Fieldwalk 1 30pm.

Thursday 27th   Talk 7 30pm. The Story of Old Road in Thornton in Craven by Vera Brearey.

Short AGM to start with. Free Entry.

 

Please note change of date from the 19th April!

Andrea Smith returns to regale us with her considerable knowledge about the canal network.  This time she will tell us about the history of the Leeds and Liverpool canal and its importance in local history and the development of trade which is a significant part of our local heritage and one that is still highly visible today.

Canal. Attribution: Clem Rutter

Whilst the tow paths a hundred and fifty years ago were peopled with working horses and barge people today they form part of a pleasant walk or running or cycling track for local residents.

Horse drawn barge near Tiverton. Attribution:geograph.org

The canal network was initially a trading network, limestone was needed for mortar and agriculture in Yorkshire and the textile mills sprang up next to the canals for ease of trade, the water from the canal also helped to cool the engines.  Coal was also an important part of this story. So come along and find out more you might be surprised at what you learn.

Did you know?

It was lime mortar that enabled houses to rise to two storeys in height, that is another significant use of the transport network and development.

Cost: Members £3.  Non members £4.50

Parking on Colne Rd. Free for first hour then 50p per hour thereafter. Pay on exit.

Banner Image: From Colne Rd. Burnley. Courtesy of Mike Clark

It’s a trip to somewhere on our doorstep  and an excellent opportunity to re aquaint ourselves or for newcomers to learn about our local heritage, this will be particularly interesting for mediaeval vernacular specialists.  We will meet in the Abbey car park at 11am then move to look at the exterior of the Lay Brothers Dormitory  one of the finest upstanding examples in the country and will then look at the East Gateway – another gem.

Whalley Abbey ruins. Attribution:John Armagh

After examining the fine remains of this 13th century Cistertian Abbey which is scheduled as an Ancient Monument and a Grade 1 listed building, we will have a 12 30pm sandwich lunch* in the Conference Centre. This is what was left of the Abbots Lodging after the Dissolution of the Monasteries by Henry VIII but has been altered and added to over the years.

After lunch – 1 30pm, we will have a guided tour of 13th century Whalley Parish Church of St. Michael and All Saints. An earlierAnglo Saxon church may have been on this site. It is mentioned in the Domesday book and was said to be one of the wealthiest in Lancashire.

Bench end. Whalley Church. Attribution: Poliphilo

This is another gem for mediaevelists. Some of the best ecclesiastical seating, “beautifully executed” and cheeky misericords, a chantry chapel, a piscina with an ogee shaped head, rood loft and St Anton’s Cage amongst other interesting features.

So come and join us  * Sandwich lunch in the Refectory is £8.50p. Pre booking essential, contact info@foph.co.uk. There are eating places available nearby and you can bring your own lunch but it will be good to get together and have a natter whilst supporting Whalley Abbey at the same time.

Some uneven ground in places, may be slippy. Everyone welcome.

Banner Image: Whalley Abbey. Attribution: Craig Thornber

Parking: In the abbey grounds or along the Sands.

Come along and join with the Friends on our Spring trip, everyone welcome. Garden lovers will be entranced by this gem, set in the North Yorkshire countryside near Ripon, the gardens are widely “considered to have the North’s largest collection of rhododendrons, azaleas and magnolias, there are nearly 20,000 plants including some 1,400 rhododendron varieties, 250 azalea varieties and 150 different magnolias. An exciting primula meadow enriches the stunning lakeside walks and the mass plantings of glorious hybrids and drifts of spring bulbs, provide fantastic seasonal interest.

Azalea in Hakgaia Botanical Garden Sri Lanka. Attribution:Sancheevis

The landscape comprises of a beautiful valley providing breathtaking views across the park and there are 45 acres of woodland, gardens and an arboretum.

“Discover over 80 striking sculptures in this open-air gallery. From a bronze leopard stalking a roe deer, to a giant floating magnolia and a mini stone henge there is something for everyone to enjoy. Each sculpture has been chosen and positioned within the landscape in a way that relates to everything around them; the weather, light, vegetation and the close and long-distance views. It is an active relationship, with each sculpture focusing, intensifying and animating its environment.”

Bring your own lunch or eat in the Tea Room or at the Horse Box.

Cost: £24 includes coach and entrance. Book at info@foph.co.uk.

Coach starts pick up at Padiham 9am then near the Heritage Centre. More details nearer the time. For further information don’t hesitate to contact us.

Some steep terrain, wear stout shoes and dress for whatever the weather throws at us.

Dr Roger Martlew will introduce us to the  oak log coffin burial first excavated in 1864 from a ditched round barrow at Scale House near Rylstone in the Yorkshire Dales.  The body has not been preserved but was wrapped in a wool textile, radio carbon dating of the coffin and a piece of textile confirmed that it was Early Bronze Age (EBA). Other similar burials turned out to be of a much later date.

Shapwick – Barrow 1838. Courtesy of Roger Martlew

This burial is thought to be one of only two sites in Britain and is thought to be unparalleled elsewhere in NW Europe.   Roger will illustrate insights into the new techniques used for examining material that has been kept in museums for many years.  He will build on published accounts casting a critical eye over current understandings in what is a relatively local area.

Come along to the last talk of the season and be inspired by these findings.

Admission: Members £3 00  Guests £4 50p.

Car park on Colne Rd. Free for first hour, then 50p per hour. Pay on exit.

Banner Image: The Rylstone Bronze Age Barrow. Attribution: Roger Martlew

 

Everyone welcome to the talk by Finds Liaison Officer Alex Whitlock from the Portable Antiquities Scheme (PAS) on artefacts found over the North West over the past year. PAS was set up by the British Museum around 1997 to record archeological artefacts  or objects found by members of the general public. This could be in your own back garden, field, mole hill, beach or anywhere.

Attribution PAS.

Expect all eras. See their website for a veritable treasure trove of finds.   Warning – an hour will not be long enough.

 

The talk will be in the Gallery over the Barn, either up the spiral staircase on the left or down the corridor and up the stairs to the left. If you want to know what these intriguing objects are – you can find out at the talk.

Parking: In the courtyard or across on Colne Rd. Free for first hour then 50p thereafter, pay on exit.

Attribution: PAS

Steve is a Lancashire based historian and author, this talk will be “A very personal account of my life in Lancashire since the 1950’s – from schooldays through to my business career, plus 30 years as a football Referee and my interest in the First World War”.

Train Enthusiasts. Attribution: Steve Williams.

So come along and listen to what life was like for him when he also talks about social history, steam railways and travel.

Admission: Members £3 00.  Guests £4 50.

Car Parking on Colne Rd. Free for first hour then 50p per hour thereafter. Pay on exit.

A Happy New Year to all, let us hope there is good health and success and a measure of joy and contentment for everyone.

From the early 1800’s the mill towns of North East (NE) Lancashire were booming after huge influxes of people from the dales and the countryside who arrived seeking the better wages that were available. The north was the birth of the industrial revolution and helped to spear head forces that changed the world, capitalism thrived but the price was paid by ordinary people, our forbears. Unfortunately living conditions were dire, houses were built rapidly and close together and became slums, hundreds of people were crammed into tenements and two up two down terraced houses could contain up to four families. Nutrition was poor and food was adulterated. Clean drinking water was unavailable to the masses, animals were slaughtered at street corners or on the backstreets. People found it difficult to walk down the streets as they were mired in mud, rubbish and sewage.

Baby Feeder. Attribution: Denise North

As a consequence of this cheek by jowl living and lack of cleanliness, mortality rates soared due to diseases such as cholera, typhoid, tuberculosis dysentery, scarlet fever. In Manchester mortality rates in 3rd Class streets were 68% greater than those in 1st Class streets according to Engles who accused the bourgeoisie of ‘social murder’.   NE Lancashire of course would have had many more 3rd class than 1st Class streets. Infant mortality rates were sky high due to a variety of factors.

Clearly something needed to be done and various Public Health Acts some of which resulted in ‘Municipal Socialism’ helped to save many lives.

Burnley Waterworks sign. Attribution: Denise North

We are pleased to welcome back a very popular speaker Denise North who will tell us of a Century of Health of the local population.

Admission: Members £3.00  Non-members £4.50                  Car Park free for first hour, then 50p per hour thereafter.

Banner Image: Burnley’s first water supply – The Shorey Well now by the Old Grammar School. Originally it was located on Shorey Bank near the old Burnley College, near the river Brun.  Attribution: Denise North.

We are continuing our walks around the vaccary boundaries surrounding Higham. This is probably our last walk of the year.

Meet 2pm outside the Village Hall. Parking at the rear.

Quern Stone in Sabden Fold. September 2022

Come suited and booted for whatever the weather throws at us.   It may be very muddy/boggy in places.  Some uneven ground and some stiles. Bring a warm drink;

In case of inclement weather ring 07779506499 to check.  Alternative activity in the Green Room at the Heritage Centre.

Come along and bring your friends this Saturday when Andrea Smith takes us on a tour of the area and the heritage that we walk or drive past frequently without noticing it is there.

Barrowford has been a centre for textile production since at least the 16th century when a fulling mill is recorded as being in the village. Until the late 18th century, the manufacture of woollen cloth was the primary industry, but in 1780 the fulling mill was rebuilt by Abraham Hargreaves as a cotton mill.

Attribution: Journal of Victorian Culture’ web site. Courtesy of Stephen Irwin.

Of course the ford can still be clearly seen today, the origins of the ‘Barrow’ part of the name remain hazy,  without proof it can only be conjectured  that a barrow existed here.  We can however see solid evidence of the travel routes in these parts in the Toll House at the end of the bridge,this is situated on what was the Marsden to Gisburn to Long Preston turnpike.    Earlier travellers would have used the packhorse bridge in Higherford, still in use for todays pedestrians.   The Leeds and Liverpool canal close by was used to transport cotton made locally across to Liverpool and the coal that was transported was used to power the looms of Lancashire and beyond.  The textile history of Lancashire is part of most people’s family history locally, not many families would not have had a relative connected to the cotton industry.  Lancashire can hold its head high as a major powerhouse of the Industrial Revolution.

A fulling mill was recorded in Barrowford in the 16th century  and until the late 18th century, the manufacture of woollen cloth was the primary industry, but in 1780 the fulling mill was rebuilt by Abraham Hargreaves as a cotton mill.

A water wheel was powered by water drawn off the weir at Pendle Water.  The mill reservoir is now an ornamental pond in the park and nearby the children’s playground the remains of the mill can still be seen.  Many handloom weavers cottages can be seen along the main road, production of  woven cotton moved from here to massive weaving sheds after the introduction of power looms in the 1820’s. 

Heavy reliance on the cotton trade for employment meant that this area would have been badly affected by the cotton famine during the American Civil War.   The local history during this time will be the subject of our talk on November 9th by Steve Irwin.

Andrea will point out lots of ‘hidden’ features that are actually in plain sight so come along and join us.

You might want to enjoy a hearty lunch or a bowl of soup in the cafe before starting out.

We will meet at 2pm outside the Barn at PHC,  wear comfortable shoes and be dressed for the weather.  If there is heavy rain contact 07779506499 to check if the walk is continuing.

Free to all

Parking in the Colne Rd. Car Park: Free for the first hour, then 50p per hour thereafter, pay on exit.

Banner Image:  A ‘Weavers Walk’ around Nelson. Attribution: A Hardman

 

The impact of the the Cotton Famine or Cotton Panic between 1861-1865 in Lancashire Mill towns was harsh.  It was the result of a ‘perfect storm’ caused by over production in the mills at a time of contracting world markets, at the same time baled cotton imports were in short supply due to the American Civil War and speculators buying up stock for storage against better economic times.  This led to a rise of several hundred per cent in the price of raw cotton.

Factory owners were forced to make people redundant and this led to a workforce that had been one of the most prosperous in Britain becoming the most impoverished. Local relief committees set up soup kitchens and granted direct aid. The poorest applied for relief under the Poor Laws and Poor Law Unions this much needed relief lasted until around 1864 when cotton imports were restored. By this time some towns had diversified and thousands of workers were said to have emigrated. It seems that due to the Public Works Act of 1864 local authorities were empowered to borrow money for cleaning rivers, rebuilding sewage systems, landscaping parks and resurfacing roads and probably water treatment works and reservoirs. Some unemployed workers must have found employment in these public ventures.

Soup Kitchen ticket. Courtesy of Blackburn Library, ‘Cotton Town’ local history web site

Prior to this for many decades cotton was Britain’s biggest import and a dominant force in the economy of the Lancashire cotton industry which had experienced the advent of the Industrial Revolution which brought a  major change in work patterns of Lancashire folk.  From small cottage industries they shifted to factory based production lines which harnessed their labour and time and governed their living and social conditions. This was when the  term ‘working class’ came into force.

Attribution: Journal of Victorian Culture’ web site. Courtesy of Stephen Irwin.
The USS San Jacinto stopping the British ship The Trent

Steve Irwin is the Education Officer at Blackburn Museum and is well placed to talk about and engage our interest in this fascinating subject, we are pleased that he is able to come and deliver this talk that was postponed last year.

Re Covid: Feel free to wear a mask, we try to ensure a supply of fresh air.   If in doubt please contact info@foph.co.uk.

Admission:  Members  £3 50p   Non members  £4 50p

Colne Rd. Car park: 50p for first two hours, then 50p per hour, pay on exit

Banner Image: Artists impression of the inside of  a mill workers home.

 

 

 

Meet outside Higham Village Hall at 2pm.

Remains of an earth bank nr. Acresbrook Rd. Higham. Aug. 21. Attribution: I Rowley

Come suited and booted for the weather.  Terrain may be rough and boggy in places underfoot. Some stiles. Some ascent/descent.

We will continue our investigation of this areas footpaths, holloways and boundaries.

Contact info@foph.co.uk for further information, ring 07779506499 if you are unsure re the weather on the day.

On the last day of Heritage Open Days Norman Mitchell will take us on a tour of the area where Jonas Moore renowned as the Father of Time lived as a child.

He was a mathematician, surveyor and a driving force behind the establishment of the Royal Observatory at Greenwhich.  He was born and grew up at Higher White Lee Farm and attended Burnley Grammar School.  His family were connected to the Pendle Witches after ‘Old Demdike’ allegedly bewitched his elder brother John to death.

Sir Jonas Moore. Line engraving by T. Cross, 1650, after H. Stone. Courtesy of Wellcome Images

It is refreshing to know that a lad from ‘oop north used his intelligence for the benefit of society and reached such a respected position in those times in London where he rubbed shoulders with the ‘great and the good’.  He was a friend of Christopher Wren and Robert Hooke, he wined and dined with Samuel Pepys who hung a map of Moores’ on his wall and also counted Moore as a ‘worthy friend’.    Moores chief patron was James, Duke of York brother to Charles 11.  He seemed to have achieved many things in his life and published his book Arithmetick in 1650, during the founding of the Observatory he paid for equipment out of his own pocket.  Along with his son he is buried in the Tower of London.

Distance: 4 miles, descending into Sabden Fold and returning. The pace will be slow.   Terrain may be boggy in places, could be rough grass.  Some stiles.

Come suited and booted for whatever the weather throws at us.   Packed lunch.

Everyone welcome to what should be a very interesting walk about a very little known local figure.

Contact info@foph.co.uk for further info.  If uncertain on the day re the weather contact 07779506499.

Donations welcome.     Parking behind the Village Hall and roadside parking.

Banner Image: Dean Farm in the ‘Hidden Valley’ near Sabden. Attribution: John Darch

We intend to have a very swift AGM followed by a talk by John Miller long associated with the Heritage Centre who will tell us about the history of what has been said to be an outstanding Heritage Garden. There are trees, plants, flowers, fruit and vegetables being grown now that would have been growing there in the early days of the buildings.

Designed as a kitchen garden in the late 18th century and lovingly restored in the 1980s it’s now maintained by the centre’s own gardeners, ably supported by volunteers some of them from the Friends (but they always need more!).  Designed and planted with traditional varieties it’s a wonderful opportunity to work in such historic surroundings so come along and volunteer.

Red Flowering Broad Beans. Attribution: Emma Walker

Originally this would have been a kitchen garden with herbs, fruit trees, vegetables and maybe even a few scented flowers to help mask the unpleasant smells in a less sanitary world than we now live in.  At about this time the house was extended and updated meaning that even in cold weather the garden could be enjoyed through the new sash windows.

The garden walls are critical to its success acting as wind breaks and storage heaters to protect the tender fruit trees as well as keeping unwelcome visitors (both human and animal) from entering.

Roses in Pendle Heritage Centre Garden. Attribution: Emma Walker

The current garden is newly created in an eighteenth century style combining ‘the useful with the sweet – the profitable with the pleasant…’, unlike the often utilitarian kitchen gardens of today.

Salads were extremely popular at this time but also consider that the mistress of the house acted as doctor, nurse, chemist and perfumier in the days before patent medicines and mass produced products!  She made mouthwashes, medicines, disinfectants, perfumes and cosmetics as well as presiding over the kitchen.  In the still room she  prepared the ingredients taken from roots, skins, leaves and flowers before drying and distilling them.

Admission: Free to all and includes light refreshments.

Car Parking: Free for the first hour then 50p per hour.

 

We will be pleased to welcome one and all, old and new faces to our first talk of 2021 and after an absence of eighteen months. It will be a pleasure to welcome Harold back to the Friends and listen to his take on these subjects and how they related to life in north east Lancashire.

15yr old Mona at a cotton mill in Lancashire. 1945. Public Domain

 

Admission:

Members free for this event in recognition of the support given to us during lockdown.   Non Members a reduced fee of £3 50.

Car Parking: Don’t forget, free for the first hour then 50p per hour thereafter.  (One of the cheapest in the area).

The Garden Tea Room will be open too if you fancy a spot of lunch before the talk.

Banner Image: An assortment of dry nasal snuff. Attribution: Hellahulla

Come and join us for a pleasant stroll around the Higham area as we tread where others have trod, hundreds of years ago. From Kiln Lane across to Foxen Dole Lane taking in a laithe farmhouse along the way and looking at the significance of various tracks and boundaries, some of which may go back to mediaeval times. Come suited and booted for the weather.

Old Ditch or hollow way Higham. 2021.
Attribution: I Rowley

Approximately 2miles, some stiles. May be uneven underfoot, long grass. No major hazards. Starting from Kiln Lane.

Meet 2pm        Park at or behind the Village Hall.

All types of archaeologists, interested people and non members welcome.

We aim to look at the former vaccary of West Close situated to the south of Higham. This forms part of our research to look at the vaccaries in Higham and also locate The Fence, which is where the deer were located until the early part of the sixteenth century.

We hope that you will be able to join us.

Walk Leader: Ian Rowley

Map of Higham Area. Courtesy of D Taylor

For further information contact info@foph.co.uk. If you are not sure re the weather contact 07779506499.

Banner image:  Higham Area.   Attribution: I Rowley

We are pleased that one of our patron’s Bobby Elliott – a local lad, born and bred in Burnley, will be entertaining an audience in the Barn at Pendle Heritage Centre on Saturday 13th November at 7 30pm.

Bobby Elliott at Apple Studios London. Courtesy of B.Elliott

So come along for a slice of life in the 60’s with our local legend who was born and bred in Burnley.  We’ll all go tripping down memory lane.

We can’t promise Carousels but you will be able to Look Through any Window and we hope that The Air that (we) Breathe is sweet.   At the end of the night we will have to Stop, Stop, Stop and some of us might be queuing at the Bus Stop.

This is our first fund raising event for 2021, we will be pleased too see you, bring a friend along.

Tickets £15 with  Cheese and Wine supper.   Bar available.

Contact info@foph.co.uk re ticket  enquiries. Limited number of tickets.

Car parking on the Colne Rd. car park, free for first hour then 50p per hour thereafter, pay on exit.

This group have been busy working away in many parts of the garden.   Weeding, planting, tidying.  We meet weekly and work alongside Pendle Heritage staff Peter and Emma. They have both worked hard over the winter making raised beds, improving the woodland walk, removing trees and planting up ready for summer.

Everyone is welcome to come along and join in the fun. Just two hours on a Wednesday morning on a regular basis can make all the difference for you and to the garden.   If you can’t make that day/time Emma will be pleased to see what best suits you.

Red Flowering Broad Beans. Attribution: Emma Walker

Why is gardening good for you?

It can help to keep your limbs and joints supple, particularly boosting hand strength, its good exercise for your heart, its good for creating a sense of calm and wellbeing which will make you feel more content.   It will give you a boost of Vitamin D.   And by having a good laugh with fellow volunteers can help to reduce stress.   What’s not to like about it?  And could it be said that gardens are good for the soul?

Don’t forget you can relax in the cafe afterwards with a cup of tea or soup or sandwiches or whatever delicious food is on offer.

Banner Image:Forsythia. Attribution:Rdsmith4.

 

Most of us will by now have experienced the the joys of vaccination.. who would have thought we would be so pleased!. We have had good weather, started a programme of walks and are looking forward to more walks and activities as we reach the end of spring and summer returns and the year progresses.

We are still hoping that in the autumn speakers who we booked last year or newer speakers can still entertain us with various aspects of our rich heritage all in keeping with the new norm of government guidelines.

Weaving history.
Attribution: A Hardman

You may remember we had booked Roger Martlew to talk about the Celtic Cowboys, the cattle ranchers of Iron Age Britain. Lancashire Wildlife Trust were coming to talk about their work. Peter and Barbara Snape were bringing us Cotton Town Chronicles with music and poetry which fitted nicely with Stephen Irwin’s talk on the Cotton Famine. A talk on Mediaeval Bridges by Chris Hudson was also in the pipeline along with Andrea Smith’s Pendle in Particular. At Christmas we would have had the joy of listening to Sue Allonby’s Christmassy Tales.

Barbara and Peter Snape of Cotton Town Chronicles. Attribution: P Snape

It looks very much like our Residential Trip to Northumberland will take place now in Spring 2022, however, perhaps the social situation will allow us to have a day trip in late Autumn. . Our trip to the Himalayan Gardens and Sculpture Park near Ripon has also been rearranged for next Spring when the azaleas will be at their best.

PAG have made a start on the Roman Road Project in walking over the site of the putative road along the public footpaths to familiarise themselves with the topography. Further activities including in depth surveys are planned. The group is working in tandem with the support of Jayne Ashe from Pendle Hill Landscape Partnership (PHLP). If you are an armchair archaeologist look no further, we have plenty of research to be going on with contact info@foph.co.uk. PAG or to be precise a member of PAG has found what may be significant lumps and bumps around the the Higham Area which the group are looking forward to explore, watch this space. We also still have the visit to Ighten Hill Manor in our back pocket.

As you know everything depends on the nature of the pandemic and government guidelines and although we still face the unknown, we know more about the unknown than at this time last year.

Prehistory Study Day. 2019 Speakers from left, Mike Woods, Kevin Grice, Rick Peterson, Sam Walsh, Catherine Rousseau- Jones and Chair Gayle Wray. Attribution: A Hardman

We hope to see you all again at one socially distanced event or another, maybe in the cafe as Pendle Heritage Centre is set to open on May 17th, I am sure you would love someone else to cook you a good meal and equally they will appreciate your badly needed custom. Don’t forget the Friends Used Book stall – through the shop to the bottom of the stairs.

We have asked for someone to host Zoom meetings and we still hope that somebody will come forward to help us in this area, just in case we have to resort to Zoom meetings in the Autumn.

Also, is there anybody out there who enjoys totting up columns of figures and handling accounts? as we are still on the look out for a Treasurer. Applicants please form a queue and get in touch with info@foph.co.uk.

Banner Image: Watching the wall of the Heritage Garden being lime mortared at our Summer Event in 2019.  Attribution: Alan Hardman

17th May –  2pm

Come along with us as we visit the eastern side of this mysterious landscape. Our first visit was certainly an eye opener and surely many people can’t have seen  double parralell and curved ditches, an apparent dam/bridge and more!

Join us as we further explore this intriguing area.

Contact info@foph to book a place. Further information later.

Banner Image: Higham Area. Spring 21. Attribution: Ian Rowley

 Eric Knowles

Eric is looking forward to visiting family who live locally and when he does as he is  very much looking forward to visiting the cafe in the Heritage Centre. It’s always nice to receive his messages of support.  As most of you will know Eric is a local lad, born and bred in Nelson.  He is an expert in his chosen field of glass and ceramics and many of you will be familiar with him as a presenter on the Antiques Road Show, Bargain Hunt and other programmes.

Bobby Elliot with the Friends in the Heritage Garden

Bobby Elliot

A member of the iconic rock band, The Hollies. Bobby met with our secretary Jean Hardman last Autumn shortly after his book was published.  We hope to see It Ain’t Heavy, It’s My Story: The Autobiography of Bobby Elliott for sale in the Heritage Centre shop before long.   Bobby has six decades worth of musical anecdotes.   Sadly it may be a while before we see him in person as he has a very busy nationwide tour later this year. We wish him good luck for the tour.

Banner Image: Bobby in the Heritage Garden with Jean Hardman, Secretary. Attribution: Alan Hardman

Well what a past twelve months this has been, however,  we have we the joys of anticipation – of vaccines, of good weather and possibly meeting up at some point this year. Spring  really is around the corner, the snowdrops are out, cyclamen too, the daffodils are pushing up, the mornings and evenings are lighter  and  a hint of  birdsong can be heard and as soon as we are able we will provide members and guests with things to do.

Blackbird. Attribution:nottsexminer

We have asked for someone to host Zoom meetings and we hope that somebody will come forward to help us in this, so speakers who we booked last year or newer speakers can still entertain us with various aspects of our rich heritage.

You may remember we had booked Roger Martlew to talk about the Celtic Cowboys, the  cattle ranchers of Iron Age Britain.  Lancashire Wildlife Trust were coming to talk about their work.  Peter and Barbara Snape were bringing us Cotton Town Chronicles with music and poetry which fitted nicely with Stephen Irwin’s talk on the Cotton Famine.    A talk on Mediaeval Bridges by Chris Hudson was also in the pipeline along with Andrea Smith’s Pendle in Particular. At christmas we would have had the joy of listening to Sue Allonby’s Christmassy Tales.

Forsythia. Attribution: Rdsmith4

We still hope to bring you  some of these via Zoom or when we can open up the Barn  for talks again.   It looks very much like our Residential Trip to Northumberland will take place now in Spring 2022, however, perhaps the social situation  will allow us to have a day trip in late Autumn.   As you know everything is on hold and depends on government guidelines. Our trip to the Himalayan Gardens and Sculpture Park near Ripon has also been rearranged for next Spring when the azaleas will be at their best.

As soon as they are able the the archaelogy group – PAG will take people in small groups to the site of Ightenhill Manor house to discuss and compare David Taylor’s work on the Manor house and the putative stabling arrangements and Ian Rowley’s work on the fields near Filly Close.   The group also want to introduce people to surveying and recording the Roman Road from Downham to the A 682 to Gisburn.

Although we still face the unknown, hope and spring is eternal… and just around the corner.

Blackbird’s nest.
Attribution: Manyman

Banner Image: Quote from Patience Strong, Welsh primroses Public Domain.

 

 

Friends of Pendle Heritage Annual General Meeting 2020

Dear Member,

Due to the current Covid-19 situation in Pendle, the present social distancing measures and future uncertainty we are taking the unusual step of asking you to vote via email or by postal ballot as you would have done had you attended the AGM in person. The Charity Commission has advised that we are able to do this and have set a date of 30 September 2020 for AGMs to be held,

There are two items to vote on:

1. The Trustees
All the present Trustees have agreed to submit themselves for re-election and in the posts that they currently hold. Two Trustees, Dawn Beaumont and Barbara Smith, resigned during the year leaving vacant positions. However, all the trusteeships are open for election. Presently the positions are held by:
Chair: Gayle Wray
Secretary: Jean Hardman
Treasurer: Vacant post
Trustee: Sue Wilkinson
Trustee: Pam Worrell
Trustee: Vacant post

The above trustees have agreed to serve another term if elected

2. Changes in our Constitution
When we became a CIO (Charitable Incorporated Organisation) last year a new Constitution was set up. We now need to amend this to allow the voting system to be more manageable, and to correct a few clerical errors.

You need to read:
1. The Changes to the Constitution. We will send you a link on request.
2. The present Constitution. (FoPH CIO Constitution) available on our website is quite dry and dusty reading however, the document in 1 above sets out the facts changes and page numbers clearly.

The Trustees have come to an agreement about the required change and are giving notice that the present Trustees and those nominated will meet and hold a de facto AGM and consider your voting responses and implement your decisions on or around Monday 28th September 2020.

Voting by email only
Please put your full name in the message box then TYPE EACH OF THESE QUESTIONS OUT FOLLOWED BY YES OR NO

1 The present trustees to remain in position
2 The Changes in the Constitution to be enacted

Then send to: The Scrutineers                    PendleHeritageFriends@gmail.com

Voting by post only
Complete the voting slip below and place in an envelope with your name and signature and nothing else on the ENVELOPE.
Put in another envelope and address to The Scrutineers, FoPH Ballot,
18 Dyneley Ave. Cliviger, Burnley BB10 4JD.

As our mail shots cost us …… we are asking you to post this back to the scrutineers. To arrive on or before Friday 25th September 2020

Only when you have voted can we contact the Charity Commission and apply to change the Constitution.
After the AGM has been held we will email the Trustees’ Report and the minutes of the meeting to you. For people not on e mail these will be available at the first talk that we can hold according to government guidelines.

Chair Gayle Wray            August 2020

Tear off slip ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

Friends of Pendle Heritage Postal Ballot September 2020

I agree to vote for the present trustees to remain in position Yes No (please circle or tick)

I agree to the proposed changes In the constitution of the Friends of Pendle Heritage

Yes No

Signed ……………………………………………………………………………………………………… Date …… September 2020

Come along for an evening that is connected on many levels to our local lives and definitely those of our ancestors. Cotton Town Chronicles is a folk song based presentation by Peter and Barbara Snape.  With its multi-media format, the presentation provides an introduction to life during the age when cotton and coal were king.

Barbara and Peter Snape of Cotton Town Chronicles. Attribution: P Snape

It is a journey in which key moments of social history provide the context for the song to take centre stage. Each song tells a story – it’s Grease, Grit and Grime, Mills, Mines and Machinery: poverty, struggle, love, humanity and the ability to look on the bright side of life. It is  a look at Lancashire Life during this time period through a different lens, it is a social history synopsis.

It’s St. Patricks Day too, our Irish millworker ancestors would have been having a knees up on this day a century ago.

Hot Supper.

Admission price to be confirmed. Please book at info@foph,co.uk

Don’t forget to pay on exit from the car park on Colne Rd. Free for first hour then 50p per hour thereafter.

Come and enjoy a bit of pre Christmas storytelling. Both Christmas and the Winter Solstice have long been a time to sit round the hearth sharing old tales, so prepare to have your spine chilled and your heart warmed in turn, with some seasonal stories.  We are pleased that Sue can join us this year after the last years event was postponed.

Sue Allonby, Storyteller.
Attribution: S Allonby

Sue Allonby has had a lifelong love of traditional stories and tales, beginning with those told to her as a small child by her grandparents. She collects books of all kinds of stories, and of folklore and traditions, but prefers collecting aurally.

She has worked as a teacher in Lancashire, in High Schools for nine years and in Primary Schools for thirteen years, and was a school librarian for eight years, during which time she developed a love of telling stories as well as reading them.

A visit to the Scottish Storytelling Centre in 2008 led to her decision to devote more time to storytelling, and in 2010 she completed the “Now of Storytelling” thirteen week course at Emerson College, Sussex.

As well as storytelling, Sue loves hill-walking and exploring the countryside by foot and bicycle. She draws much of the inspiration for her telling from her local landscapes of Pendle Hill, the Pennines, the Ribble Valley and the Yorkshire Dales. She has also travelled extensively around the world, always with her ears open for a good story!

Ready to Travel.
Attribution: Sue Allonby

 

Don’t forget to pay on exit from the car park on Colne Rd.

 

 

Latest news from Emma in the Heritage Garden.

The spring display as well as fruit blossom have been and gone already. It has been a good year for the veg patch so far, much better than this time last year when the weather had been good for nothing but slugs. I have some nice crimson flowered broad beans coming and the peas are also growing well.

Roses in Pendle Heritage Centre Garden. Attribution: Emma Walker
At the moment the cornflowers are the main highlight though it is a bit of an intermittent time. The Roses should be out fully in the next few weeks. The delphinium in the kitchen garden is also full of bud.
Keep watching this space for more news and hopefully before long we may be able to see the garden for ourselves.

All images attributed to Emma Walker.

Roses in Pendle Heritage Centre Garden. Attribution: Emma Walker

Due to the uncertainty surrounding the current epidemic, we are sorry to postpone this event and we hope that Roger will join us at a future date.

 

Dr Roger Martlew is a well known and extremely well experienced archeologist, historian, author and editor. He taught archaeology for sixteen years at Leeds University and we hope that he will enlighten our understanding of the Celts or Iron Age population in northern England.

Roger writes that ecent discoveries are adding detail and complexity to our understanding of the Iron Age and “native” Romano-British inhabitants of northern England. We have moved on a long way from the late 1950s view (from southern England) of “Celtic cow-boys”, but there are still big gaps in our knowledge and much that awaits discovery. Following many years of investigation in Upper Wharfedale, Dr Roger Martlew will highlight the major achievements of recent research and consider the questions that remain. The picture shows a statue of Ambiorix, a Belgian chieftain, and represents a romantic view of Iron Age Celts at the dawn of History that provokes a wide-ranging discussion.

Statue of Ambiorix. A romantic view of a Belgian Chieftan. Courtesty: R. Martlew
An IA unit from Norfolk of Ece(n) Iceni Celtic Coin. Attribution:2007 Oxford University and Portable Antiquities Scheme

Who were these …”Celtic cowboys and shepherds footloose and unpredicatable moving with their animals over rough pasture and moorland” (Piggot S. 1958)? And how do we interpret evidence from the past? Is the term Celtic a problematic term?  Lots of questions and we are looking forward to Roger enlightening us on the archaeology, art and cultural identity of these people who seem very familiar to us, but are they?.

However, did the Celts arise out of the mists of Brittannia or the Pretannic Isles or did they come from further afield?  Where did they live? How did they live and die and where is the evidence for this?

The earliest known mentions of the Celts were by writers such as Herodotus, Plato, Aristotle, Xenophon and somebody we all know… Julius Caesar who also wrote about Celtic migrations and wrote of the “..inlanders, most do not sow corn, but live on milk and flesh and clothe themselves in skins”.

Come along to the first talk of the 2020/21 season and enlarge your understanding of this fascinating subject.

Government Guidelines:  We very much hope that the talk is allowed to go ahead. Further information will be published on our site regarding  social distancing and other behaviours that we need to adhere to.  If in doubt please contact info@foph.co.uk.

Banner Image: We don’t want to give anything away but this tantalising image of the Hochdorf Chieftan’s Grave, Germany about 530 BC was too good to miss.   This chap is known as the Tutankhamun of the Celts. The reconstruction in the museum is near to the location of the original grave. Attribution: jnn95.  He is also wearing fabulous gold trimmed shoes.

 

Nestled in the West Yorkshire countryside at Grewelthorpe near Ripon,  this rare gem offers those of us interested in beautiful gardens a rare day out.

The landscape comprises of 45 acres, a beautiful valley with breathtaking views across the park, gardens, an arboretum,  scenic woodland walks and  is  enhanced by three lakes and has a Pagoda, Summerhouse, Himalayan Shelter, Contemplation Circle and Norse Hut. What more could you ask?

Widely considered to have the North’s largest collection of rhododendrons, azaleas and magnolias, there are nearly 20,000 plants including some 1,400 rhododendron varieties, 250 azalea varieties and 150 different magnolias. An exciting primula meadow enriches the stunning lakeside walks and the mass plantings of glorious hybrids and drifts of spring bulbs, provide fantastic seasonal interest.

Azalea in Hakgaia Botanical Garden Sri Lanka. Attribution:Sancheevis

Discover over 80 striking contemporary sculptures in the open-air gallery. From a bronze leopard stalking a roe deer, to a giant floating magnolia and a mini stone henge there is something for everyone to enjoy. Each sculpture has been chosen and positioned within the landscape in a way that relates to everything around them; the weather, light, vegetation and the close and long-distance views. It is an active relationship, with each sculpture focusing, intensifying and animating its environment.

Although this will be a lovely place to visit at any time of year, May is the prime time for azalea, rhododendron and primula displays.

We aim to set off at 9 30am in Padiham picking up at 9 45am in Barrowford. There is a Tea Room which serves sandwiches and hot lunches and surely there must be cream scones?    It’s perfectly acceptable to take your own packed lunch. There are some steep areas in places and suitable footwear is advised. Be ready for whatever the weather may throw at us, remember the “Cast not a clout ’til May is out” that our grandparents used to say!

Azalea. Attribution: Eurico Zimbres

We can offer a coach trip to Ripon only, where you can spend more than one day exploring this lovely city, the fourth smallest in the country. With a Cathedral going back to mediaeval times, an ancient marketplace,  a hornblower who ‘sets the watch’ as in every night for the past 1100 years, Georgian and mediaeval buildings, and enough museums to satisfy the most ardent visitor.  Check out the ticket prices. You will be dropped off  about 11am and the coach will pick you up on the return journey about 4 15 pm.

Cost: £21.00 including coach.    Ripon only by coach £10.50. Booking essential

To book and for further info please contact Gayle Wray gw@gayle-victoria.com

For the gardens and sculpture park:
info@himalayangarden.com