Friends of Pendle Heritage Annual General Meeting 2020

Dear Member,

Due to the current Covid-19 situation in Pendle, the present social distancing measures and future uncertainty we are taking the unusual step of asking you to vote via email or by postal ballot as you would have done had you attended the AGM in person. The Charity Commission has advised that we are able to do this and have set a date of 30 September 2020 for AGMs to be held,

There are two items to vote on:

1. The Trustees
All the present Trustees have agreed to submit themselves for re-election and in the posts that they currently hold. Two Trustees, Dawn Beaumont and Barbara Smith, resigned during the year leaving vacant positions. However, all the trusteeships are open for election. Presently the positions are held by:
Chair: Gayle Wray
Secretary: Jean Hardman
Treasurer: Vacant post
Trustee: Sue Wilkinson
Trustee: Pam Worrell
Trustee: Vacant post

The above trustees have agreed to serve another term if elected

2. Changes in our Constitution
When we became a CIO (Charitable Incorporated Organisation) last year a new Constitution was set up. We now need to amend this to allow the voting system to be more manageable, and to correct a few clerical errors.

You need to read:
1. The Changes to the Constitution. We will send you a link on request.
2. The present Constitution. (FoPH CIO Constitution) available on our website is quite dry and dusty reading however, the document in 1 above sets out the facts changes and page numbers clearly.

The Trustees have come to an agreement about the required change and are giving notice that the present Trustees and those nominated will meet and hold a de facto AGM and consider your voting responses and implement your decisions on or around Monday 28th September 2020.

Voting by email only
Please put your full name in the message box then TYPE EACH OF THESE QUESTIONS OUT FOLLOWED BY YES OR NO

1 The present trustees to remain in position
2 The Changes in the Constitution to be enacted

Then send to: The Scrutineers                    PendleHeritageFriends@gmail.com

Voting by post only
Complete the voting slip below and place in an envelope with your name and signature and nothing else on the ENVELOPE.
Put in another envelope and address to The Scrutineers, FoPH Ballot,
18 Dyneley Ave. Cliviger, Burnley BB10 4JD.

As our mail shots cost us …… we are asking you to post this back to the scrutineers. To arrive on or before Friday 25th September 2020

Only when you have voted can we contact the Charity Commission and apply to change the Constitution.
After the AGM has been held we will email the Trustees’ Report and the minutes of the meeting to you. For people not on e mail these will be available at the first talk that we can hold according to government guidelines.

Chair Gayle Wray            August 2020

Tear off slip ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

Friends of Pendle Heritage Postal Ballot September 2020

I agree to vote for the present trustees to remain in position Yes No (please circle or tick)

I agree to the proposed changes In the constitution of the Friends of Pendle Heritage

Yes No

Signed ……………………………………………………………………………………………………… Date …… September 2020

We are sorry to have to postpone this talk, we hope to re book Stephen as soon as Government guidelines allow us to do so.

The impact of the the Cotton Famine or Cotton Panic between 1861-1865 in Lancashire Mill towns was harsh.  It was the result of a ‘perfect storm’ caused by over production in the mills at a time of contracting world markets, at the same time baled cotton imports were in short supply due to the American Civil War and speculators buying up stock for storage against better economic times.  This led to a rise of several hundred per cent in the price of raw cotton.

Factory owners were forced to make people redundant and this led to a workforce that had been one of the most prosperous in Britain becoming the most impoverished. Local relief committees set up soup kitchens and granted direct aid. The poorest applied for relief under the Poor Laws and Poor Law Unions this much needed relief lasted until around 1864 when cotton imports were restored. By this time some towns had diversified and thousands of workers were said to have emigrated. It seems that due to the Public Works Act of 1864 local authorities were empowered to borrow money for cleaning rivers, rebuilding sewage systems, landscaping parks and resurfacing roads and probably water treatment works and reservoirs. Some unemployed workers must have found employment in these public ventures.

Soup Kitchen ticket. Courtesy of Blackburn Library, ‘Cotton Town’ local history web site

 

Prior to this for many decades cotton was Britain’s biggest import and a dominant force in the economy of the Lancashire cotton industry which had experienced the advent of the Industrial Revolution which brought a  major change in work patterns of Lancashire folk.  From small cottage industries they shifted to factory based production lines which harnessed their labour and time and governed their living and social conditions. This was when the  term ‘working class’ came into force.

Attribution: Journal of Victorian Culture’ web site. Courtesy of Stephen Irwin.
The USS San Jacinto stopping the British ship The Trent

Steve Irwin is the Education Officer at Blackburn Museum and is well placed to talk about and engage our interest in this fascinating subject.

Government Guidelines:  We very much hope that the talk is allowed to go ahead. Further information will be published on our site regarding  social distancing and other behaviours that we need to adhere to.  If in doubt please contact info@foph.co.uk.

Banner Image: Artists impression of the inside of  a mill workers home.

 

 

 

Come along for an evening that is connected on many levels to our local lives and definitely those of our ancestors. Cotton Town Chronicles is a folk song based presentation by Peter and  Barbara Snape.  With its multi-media format, the presentation provides an introduction to life during the age when cotton and coal were king.

Barbara and Peter Snape of Cotton Town Chronicles. Attribution: P Snape

It is a journey in which key moments of social history provide the context for the song to take centre stage. Each song tells a story – it’s Grease, Grit and Grime, Mills, Mines and Machinery: poverty, struggle, love, humanity and the ability to look on the bright side of life. It is  a look at Lancashire Life during this time period through a different lens, it is a social history synopsis.

A supper of Lancashire Hotpot – what else – will be provided.

Admission price to be confirmed.

Don’t forget to pay on exit from the car park on Colne Rd.

Due to the uncertainty surrounding the current epidemic, we are sorry to postpone this event and we hope that Sue will join us at a future date.

 

Come and enjoy a bit of pre Christmas storytelling. Both Christmas and the Winter Solstice have long been a time to sit round the hearth sharing old tales, so prepare to have your spine chilled and your heart warmed in turn, with some seasonal stories.

Sue Allonby, Storyteller.
Attribution: S Allonby

Sue Allonby has had a lifelong love of traditional stories and tales, beginning with those told to her as a small child by her grandparents. She collects books of all kinds of stories, and of folklore and traditions, but prefers collecting aurally.

She has worked as a teacher in Lancashire, in High Schools for nine years and in Primary Schools for thirteen years, and was a school librarian for eight years, during which time she developed a love of telling stories as well as reading them.

A visit to the Scottish Storytelling Centre in 2008 led to her decision to devote more time to storytelling, and in 2010 she completed the “Now of Storytelling” thirteen week course at Emerson College, Sussex.

As well as storytelling, Sue loves hill-walking and exploring the countryside by foot and bicycle. She draws much of the inspiration for her telling from her local landscapes of Pendle Hill, the Pennines, the Ribble Valley and the Yorkshire Dales. She has also travelled extensively around the world, always with her ears open for a good story!

Ready to Travel.
Attribution: Sue Allonby

Enjoy light Christmas Refreshments too.   Cost TBA.

Don’t forget to pay on exit from the car park on Colne Rd.

 

 

Latest news from Emma in the Heritage Garden.

The spring display as well as fruit blossom have been and gone already. It has been a good year for the veg patch so far, much better than this time last year when the weather had been good for nothing but slugs. I have some nice crimson flowered broad beans coming and the peas are also growing well.

Roses in Pendle Heritage Centre Garden. Attribution: Emma Walker
At the moment the cornflowers are the main highlight though it is a bit of an intermittent time. The Roses should be out fully in the next few weeks. The delphinium in the kitchen garden is also full of bud.
Keep watching this space for more news and hopefully before long we may be able to see the garden for ourselves.

All images attributed to Emma Walker.

Roses in Pendle Heritage Centre Garden. Attribution: Emma Walker

Due to the uncertainty surrounding the current epidemic, we are sorry to postpone this event and we hope that Roger will join us at a future date.

 

Dr Roger Martlew is a well known and extremely well experienced archeologist, historian, author and editor. He taught archaeology for sixteen years at Leeds University and we hope that he will enlighten our understanding of the Celts or Iron Age population in northern England.

Roger writes that ecent discoveries are adding detail and complexity to our understanding of the Iron Age and “native” Romano-British inhabitants of northern England. We have moved on a long way from the late 1950s view (from southern England) of “Celtic cow-boys”, but there are still big gaps in our knowledge and much that awaits discovery. Following many years of investigation in Upper Wharfedale, Dr Roger Martlew will highlight the major achievements of recent research and consider the questions that remain. The picture shows a statue of Ambiorix, a Belgian chieftain, and represents a romantic view of Iron Age Celts at the dawn of History that provokes a wide-ranging discussion.

Statue of Ambiorix. A romantic view of a Belgian Chieftan. Courtesty: R. Martlew
An IA unit from Norfolk of Ece(n) Iceni Celtic Coin. Attribution:2007 Oxford University and Portable Antiquities Scheme

Who were these …”Celtic cowboys and shepherds footloose and unpredicatable moving with their animals over rough pasture and moorland” (Piggot S. 1958)? And how do we interpret evidence from the past? Is the term Celtic a problematic term?  Lots of questions and we are looking forward to Roger enlightening us on the archaeology, art and cultural identity of these people who seem very familiar to us, but are they?.

However, did the Celts arise out of the mists of Brittannia or the Pretannic Isles or did they come from further afield?  Where did they live? How did they live and die and where is the evidence for this?

The earliest known mentions of the Celts were by writers such as Herodotus, Plato, Aristotle, Xenophon and somebody we all know… Julius Caesar who also wrote about Celtic migrations and wrote of the “..inlanders, most do not sow corn, but live on milk and flesh and clothe themselves in skins”.

Come along to the first talk of the 2020/21 season and enlarge your understanding of this fascinating subject.

Government Guidelines:  We very much hope that the talk is allowed to go ahead. Further information will be published on our site regarding  social distancing and other behaviours that we need to adhere to.  If in doubt please contact info@foph.co.uk.

Banner Image: We don’t want to give anything away but this tantalising image of the Hochdorf Chieftan’s Grave, Germany about 530 BC was too good to miss.   This chap is known as the Tutankhamun of the Celts. The reconstruction in the museum is near to the location of the original grave. Attribution: jnn95.  He is also wearing fabulous gold trimmed shoes.

 

It will come as no surprise to you that sadly, talks and events that are being run by the Friends and Pendle Archaeolgy Group are cancelled for the next twelve weeks.  We did hope that this weeks talk would go ahead but in the light of Government  advice this evening we decided that it would be safer to cancel the event.

Keep watching our website or contact info@foph.co.uk for further information and we will be in touch with you if there are any changes.

We hope that you and yours stay well and safe.

Nestled in the West Yorkshire countryside at Grewelthorpe near Ripon,  this rare gem offers those of us interested in beautiful gardens a rare day out.

The landscape comprises of 45 acres, a beautiful valley with breathtaking views across the park, gardens, an arboretum,  scenic woodland walks and  is  enhanced by three lakes and has a Pagoda, Summerhouse, Himalayan Shelter, Contemplation Circle and Norse Hut. What more could you ask?

Widely considered to have the North’s largest collection of rhododendrons, azaleas and magnolias, there are nearly 20,000 plants including some 1,400 rhododendron varieties, 250 azalea varieties and 150 different magnolias. An exciting primula meadow enriches the stunning lakeside walks and the mass plantings of glorious hybrids and drifts of spring bulbs, provide fantastic seasonal interest.

Azalea in Hakgaia Botanical Garden Sri Lanka. Attribution:Sancheevis

Discover over 80 striking contemporary sculptures in the open-air gallery. From a bronze leopard stalking a roe deer, to a giant floating magnolia and a mini stone henge there is something for everyone to enjoy. Each sculpture has been chosen and positioned within the landscape in a way that relates to everything around them; the weather, light, vegetation and the close and long-distance views. It is an active relationship, with each sculpture focusing, intensifying and animating its environment.

Although this will be a lovely place to visit at any time of year, May is the prime time for azalea, rhododendron and primula displays.

We aim to set off at 9 30am in Padiham picking up at 9 45am in Barrowford. There is a Tea Room which serves sandwiches and hot lunches and surely there must be cream scones?    It’s perfectly acceptable to take your own packed lunch. There are some steep areas in places and suitable footwear is advised. Be ready for whatever the weather may throw at us, remember the “Cast not a clout ’til May is out” that our grandparents used to say!

Azalea. Attribution: Eurico Zimbres

We can offer a coach trip to Ripon only, where you can spend more than one day exploring this lovely city, the fourth smallest in the country. With a Cathedral going back to mediaeval times, an ancient marketplace,  a hornblower who ‘sets the watch’ as in every night for the past 1100 years, Georgian and mediaeval buildings, and enough museums to satisfy the most ardent visitor.  Check out the ticket prices. You will be dropped off  about 11am and the coach will pick you up on the return journey about 4 15 pm.

Cost: £21.00 including coach.    Ripon only by coach £10.50. Booking essential

To book and for further info please contact Gayle Wray gw@gayle-victoria.com

For the gardens and sculpture park:
info@himalayangarden.com

Well spring has sprung and we’re on our way to summer, it would be good to see a good bunch of people helping  Andrea, Peter and Emma make the Heritage Garden at Park Hill look its very best. So come prepared for whatever the weather may throw at us.   Two hours out of the month is not a lot of hours to pledge but it makes a huge difference when you are part of a willing team and it will make a good impact in the garden.

Hen Blackbird, waiting for worms whilst I dig! Attribution:gailhampshire

 

Bring your own lunch and eat it in the garden or have a warm bowl of soup from the Cafe.

Cherry Tree near Millenium Garden. Attribution mattbuck

‘When you’re young you prefer the vulgar months, the fullness of the seasons. As you grow older you learn to like the in-between times, the months that can’t make up their minds. Perhaps it’s a way of admitting that things can’t ever bear the same certainty again.”
Julian Barnes, Flauberts Parrot. 

Banner Image: Pink Peony grown in a Midlothian, Virginia USA backyard. Attribution:Mitzi.humphrey

When you have been digging up turf and scraping back the soil and emptying the buckets on the soil heap and your knees and back are aching there is nothing better than turning up a small fragment or shard of pottery!

Pottery identification is an extremely valuable aid to dating archeological sites and their possible use.     It is usually the most common find and is more stable than metals and organic materials.

Find Of The Day – rim sherd of a late Medieval/early Post Medieval vessel

The facts that can be discovered by examining a piece of pottery are fascinating. If you find an intact piece, what can be deduced from inside the pot ie its useage is equally as riveting as how and where the pot was made. Traces left in a container at Must Farm revealed what the food was that had been cooked in the pot, the seeds which then revealed probable agricultural practices and the type of animal fat that the food was cooked in. Bronze Age pots commonly contain human ash or bones.

Burial Urn. Whitelow. Attribution: Sam Walsh

Pottery informs us of cultural practices, rituals, food eaten and animal use amongst other things. The style and decoration of the pottery also holds many clues as to its age and where it was made.    The nature of the fabric of the pot is also useful, most are made from clay some contain inclusions which may consist of flint, human or animal bone.   Patterns of wear and tear and also decorative patterns on the base or rim can be significant in identifying the piece.   Putting the pieces together can be a slow painstaking process.

Collating Various Group Finds. Nov. 2016. Attribution: Alex Whitlock

In short, studying pottery and pottery fragments ought to make one a good detective.  So come along and listen to David’s talk on the Importance of Pottery. David is our Roman expert, having been instrumental in being one of the first two people to carry out expert geophysical exploration on Hadrian’s Wall.  This is just an introduction to whet your appetite.

Found at a reservoir near Widdup Moor. Copyright Alex Whitlock

Meet in the café for a chit chat at 10 am or 10 30 in the Green Room.

Afterwards we will have a short meeting to discuss future plans and activities. It’s over to  you the members.   Non-members welcome.

Banner Image: Samian Ware. British Museum, Portable Antiquities SchemeTwo adjoining sherds of pot thrown Roman terra sigillata (samian sare) from the same vessel dating to the period AD 43-250. The sherds have an orangey patina and the majority of the glaze is intact. There is a raised U shape repetitive motif around the top with a raised line below and beneath that raised relief of a galloping horse and rider looking backwards.

There is a bound to be a blackbirds nest somewhere around Pendle Heritage Centre, the pay off for this is the  lovely song of the male blackbird that you will hear when you come and help Andrea and the gang in the Heritage Garden.

Welsh Primrose. Public Domain

Any support at all in the garden will be much appreciated, its for two hours only, once a month although you would be welcome to put in more time. Every little helps to make the garden look better in the growing and  flowering  season which means that you will get a good sense of satisfaction from seeing the ‘fruit of your labours’.  You can always dodge the April Showers by spending time in the Garden Museum.

Narcissus triandrus Attribution: Xavier Martin

Just turn up at 10 am suited and booted with a willingness to take part, that’s all you need.  You might enjoy a convivial lunch in the cafe afterwards.

Remember Audrey Hepburn?  This is what she had to say about gardening  “To plant a garden is to believe in tomorrow”.

Banner Image: Blackbird’s nest. Attribution: Manyman

Spring will be definitely underway by March and the first sparkling waves of daffodils will have gladdened our eyes.  The Gardening Group will have made the first foray into the garden and Peter and Emma will be busy and needing our support, why not come along and give two hours of your time to help make the garden beautiful.

Jonquil Attribution: Fir0002/Flagsstaffotos.

Every little bit of time you can give will make a difference to the garden itself and to the people working in the garden and you can be sure your work appreciated by The Friends, Pendle Heritage Centre and the people working there as well as the people who can see into the garden from the cafe and by those who walk through it.

You might be like Alice Sebold who said ” I like gardening. It’s a place where I find myself when I need to lose myself, now you won’t get lost in the the Heritage Garden but you might find you lose yourself on a warm spring day in the peace and quiet listening to the birds singing.

Forsythia. Attribution: Rdsmith4

 

The Cafe is always there for a hearty lunch or a warming bowl of soup.   Come along and give us a hand, we will be glad of your company and your support.

Banner Image: Narcissus: Attribution: Kropsoq

In Hyde Park: D Hawgood

It’s that time of year  when everything starts to shift and the sap starts to rise in order for nature to begin to bring forth the glories of the earth.  It’s also the time when Andrea and the gang, on behalf of The Friends, start working in the garden and helping Peter and Emma prepare the garden for the year ahead.

We are looking for people who can give just two hours a month to help in the garden. Of course you are welcome to contribute more hours if you  liase with Peter or Emma.  There are lots of jobs to do in order to maintain the Heritage Garden and your labour goes towards helping it  to look like something that is special in our area.

Yellow Daffodils: John O’Neill

They say that gardening is good for the soul, it certainly is a wise thing to commune with nature every now and then.  So wrap up warm and bring some enthusiasm to help us get off to a good start..  You might also fancy a hearty bowl of warming soup in the Cafe afterwards.

 

According to Marcus Tullius Cicero “If you have a garden and a library, you have everything you need”.   Well we have the garden and Nelson and Colne have the library, what else do we need!

Banner Image: Snowdrops Lothersdale Churchyard. Attribution:
T. Green

After a swift AGM Andrea Smith is back to continue telling and showing us about our local heritage.    Pendle is a wide area, the people, places, buildings and countryside are familiar to us and yet not so familiar if we

Looking across the east face of Pendle Hill. Attribution: Kevin Rushton

look at things from different angles and different perspectives.

So come along and listen and look at unusual, interesting and iconic features of our Pendle heritage.

Members will be given the opportunity to have their say at the AGM and see the election of the new officers, and hear brief reports,  all will be done as quickly as possible.

Clitheroe War Memorial and Pendle in the distance.
Attribution Alexander P. Kapp

No charge. Free light refreshments.

Check out the parking. Free for first hour, then 50p per hour, pay on exit.

Banner Image:Worston Moor forms the NW side of Pendle Hill. Attribution: Jon Royle

This is what Chris Hudson the speaker has to say about his forthcoming talk. “I am passionate about historic engineering, civil and mechanical, primarily driven by a fascination with the Victorian legacy. Engineering heritage of Britain however extends back to medieval times, and who doesn’t get excited by the history of Castles, Abbeys & Churches, where the questions we all ask are “how did they build this?” and “how is it still standing!?”. Nothing gets built without infrastructure though, and we are fortunate that Roman Roads, Pack Horse trails and medieval bridges still remain today for our generation to witness, appreciate and in some instances still use. Conservation and maintenance of existing historic structures falls within the remit of the Civil Engineering industry today.  

Whalley Bridge by JMW Turner. Credit: C. Hudson

Many Civil Engineers operate as specialists such as bridge designers; however I am a multi-discipline Civil Engineer. Whilst bridge design and maintenance is one string to my bow, I hold diverse industry experience. I use my personal desire to research, learn and knowledge share of vital importance alongside my day to day job as a Designer/Civil Engineer. Working in a sector that includes River Engineering, I often find myself working with bridge structures of many forms including medieval arch structures. My role may entail design focused on maintenance, improvement or protection to extend the life of the structure. Contrary, understanding the mechanics of how a bridge works is of utmost importance be it a stone arch, iron truss, steel beam or a concrete structure”.

Clitheroe, from Eadsford Bridge circa 1799 JMW Turner. Art Gallery of Ontario http://www.tate.org.uk/art/work/TW0887
Chris Hudson at Edisford Bridge. Credit: C. Hudson

   Chris is a Chartered Civil Engineer with over 20 years experience which has included many roles such as as a Highways Designer, Bridge Inspector & Bridge Maintenance Designer. Chris spent some time working for York City Council where he gained experience in respect to Historic Conservation aspects of Civil Engineering.   He now works in the Rivers, Coastal Protection and Marine Sector of the industry.

He is a member of the Institution of Civil Engineers (ICE) and currently sits as Junior Vice Chair for the North West of England and has previously represented his institution as Lancashire Branch Chair.   He also sits on the ICE North West Historic Engineering Group committee representing  Lancashire & Cumbria.  During 2018, the Institution of Civil Engineers bicentenary, Chris has been delivered talks to public groups about Civil Engineering on a diverse range of topics such as Cumbrian Mine Sea Defences, Fleetwood Lighthouses, Preston Dock & Straightening of the Ribble.

Chris is also a STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering & Maths) Ambassador and on the back of all his hard work during 2018, he won the accolade of ‘Volunteer of the Year’ from the Institution of Civil Engineers North West. In the same year he was invited to attend a reception at the House of Lords on the invitation of Professor Lord Robert Mair, the President of the Institution of Civil Engineers for his substantial commitment to raising the profile of Civil Engineering in the public realm during the institutions bicentennial year.

What a busy person, we are very much looking forward to hearing him talk.

Attributions for all images: Chris Hudson.

A lovely day on Calf Hill. Day 3. Sept 2019. Attribution: C Rousseau Jones

Weather permitting, a field walk around the Craggs area, near Sabden, to revisit the site of past work and discuss future investigations of the area and Pendle’s Hidden Valley Project.
Meet 10am at the Cafe at the Heritage Centre. Come suited and booted for the weather and bring a packed lunch. If you have any concerns before the day contact info@foph.co.uk
If the weather is inclement ring 07779506499.

Pendle Archaeology Group aka PAG is also on facebook
https://www.facebook.com/pendlearchaeologygroup

Banner Image: On the way to Fox Clough 2019. Attribution:C Rousseau Jones

Happy New Year to all archaeology minded people and if you want to know more about what we are planning for the next year, come along to the cafe for a cuppa or brunch at 10 am or the Green Room for the meeting at 10 30 and get involved in the decision making.

Firstly this is a meeting for the Friends to come and give their views on the structure and future direction of the group and the future programme of activities for the next twelve months to include digs, surveys, research, walks and other archaeological activities.

Collating Various Group Finds. Nov. 2016. Attribution: Alex Whitlock

Secondly we have a speaker – Alex Whitlock who is a Finds Liason Officer  (FLO) for Lancashire and Cumbria who will talk on the Portable Antiquities Scheme (PAS) and how it relates to local archaeology.

Parking

Free next to the barn, across the road free for the first hour then 50p an hour, pay on exit.

Banner Image: Diggers at Work. August 2019. Calf Hill. Attribution: C.Rousseau Jones.

 

Victorian ballad singer and Lancashire dialect enthusiast Jennifer Reid is putting together a Lancashire Dialect Reading Group in Pendle. Jennifer will give a short talk including singing, clog dancing and archival oral history recordings to introduce you to the material. The group is inspired by Nelson local Paul Graney, who collected and preserved a large range of Lancashire folklore and music history.

Jennifer Reid at with H and Jules at Northlight Mill, Brierfield at the Shapes of Water Sounds of Hope event.
As part of the Pendle Radicals strand of the wider Pendle Hill Landscape Partnership project which is unfolding over four years in Pendle, Jennifer will be leading a Lancashire Dialect Reading Group meeting monthly and taking the group for visits to the Paul Graney archive at Manchester Central Library. The group will begin as a reading circle, with dialect material drawn from the localities represented by the groups members. As the project develops, the group will have chance to translate their favourite Standard English poems and even write their own if they feel brave enough!
Visits to local industrial and cultural heritage sites are envisaged and there is scope for two shared events to showcase the group’s written, orated and translated poems. This reads rather wordy but all it really is is meeting up, sharing the poems we know and love, with the chance to write your own on the table. Enjoy a relaxed, convivial atmosphere with your neighbours,facilitated by a world-class ballad singer.

Even if you may not at first be interested in joining the group come along and listen to Jennifer’s gutsy and ebullient performance, it s a joy to see someone young so involved in our Lancashire heritage and in preserving it for the future.

Jennifer Reid with the Hairy Bikers on the Pubs that Built Britain tour at the
Cost £2 including refreshments.
Don’t forget to pay on exit from the car park. It’s free for the first hour, thereafter 50p per hour.
Credits: All images see Jennifer’s website JenniferRead@weebly.com

It will come as no surprise to you that sadly this talk and other events that are being run by the Friends and Pendle Archaeolgy Group are cancelled for the next twelve weeks.  We did hope that the talk would go ahead but in the light of Government  advice this evening we decided that it would be safer to cancel the event.   Keep watching our website or contact info@foph.co.uk for further information.

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Lancashire Wildlife Trust are a  local charity, working hard to improve the local area for wildlife and for people in Lancashire, Manchester and North Merseyside.   Since 1912, The Wildlife Trusts have been speaking out for nature in the UK their organisation is unique – while most of their work for wildlife takes place at local grassroots level, they have a national voice.

Bill Oddie and Kate Humble at Mere Sands Wood. Rufford. Credit: Lancs. Wildlife Trust

They aim to restore, recreate and reconnect wildlife-rich spaces in rural and urban areas by working in partnership with local communities, landowners, schools and businesses. They are identifying key areas to protect for wildlife; enlarging, improving and joining them up across the UK on nature reserves, in towns and cities, and in partnership with hundreds of other landowners.

Murmuration of Starlings. Heysham. Credit. Lancs. Wildlife Trust

The Wildlife Trust is a membership organisation – their members share a love of nature and care about protecting wildlife for future generations. This support allows them  to work on your doorstep to create and connect habitats, giving wildlife a chance to thrive and protecting wild spaces for people to enjoy.

Wildlife Trust Logo

Banner Image: Orange Tip Butterfly. Attribution: Alice Singleton

Now you might have thought this talk was about the Industrialisation of Hapton but somehow gremlins interfered so Brian Jeffery will start this  talk on Altham by briefly outlining its history from the time of the Norman Conquest. At that time, life within the township revolved around the industry of  farming and the pastime of hunting. Industry, as we know it, started in the 18C.  Its subjects are the roles of water and coal in the industrialisation of Altham and the part played by Altham Corn Mill.

Altham Corn Mill. 18/11/19.
Attribution: B Jeffery

After the introduction, this illustrated talk of 97 maps, diagrams and photographs focuses on the 13C Altham Corn Mill and its later relationship with the famous Peel family. Both the mill and the Peels played an important part in Altham’s 18th – 20C industrial development.

The Walton Arms. Altham. Attribution: B Jeffery

It takes a step back to the 1760’s to introduce the arrival of steam power to Clayton-le-Moors and the intense commercial rivalry that developed in the 1780’s between the families of  Lomax of Clayton and Walton of Altham and Nelson. Despite losing the legal dispute in an out-of court settlement, the situation was saved by a very clever move by the Walton family. This involved the building in the 18th century of a wooden bridge over the River Calder and many miles of 2ft gauge horse-drawn tramway. It also involved the harnessing of Altham Corn Mill’s ancient leat, a tunnel under the 1755 Blackburn to Addingham Turnpike and many waterwheels.

Altham Old Corn Mill Cottages. Attribution: B Jeffery

It was all change in 1801 with the opening of the Leeds and Liverpool Canal from Burnley to Henfield, the digging of the Hargreaves’ Coal Company’s last deep mine in Altham, the huge discovery of clean water for Accrington and the rebuilding of the 1776 Altham Turnpike Bridge in 1927.

Banner Image: Altham Church. Attribution: Brian Jeffery

 

Can you believe its nearly a year since the last one? No, me neither.

We have managed to secure yet again the services of ever popular local quiz masters John and Anne Dodd.

Who will you be this year the Smarties? the bright and breezy, the know it alls?

That light bulb moment!

Brush up on your general knowledge and get ready for a Lancashire themed  Quiz. It’s Lancashire day on the Wednesday.  Now who was that famous cricketer from Nelson in the ’60’s?

Sharpen your pencils and it could be you walking away with first prize this year.

£8 with Potato Pie Supper included.   Teams of 4.

Don’t miss out, limited numbers, tickets available in the Shop, pre booking essential.

(Please pay cash in the shop as it helps with the admin. process. Thankyou)

Here’s your starter for ten…..

Who said:

“Behind every great man is a woman rolling her eyes”…..   Jim Carrey

“Do not take life too seriously. You will never get out of it alive” ….. Elbert Humphrey

“To succeed in life you need three things, a wishbone, a backbone and a funny bone”.

Reba McEntire

CAR PARKING: Please be aware that it is free for the first hour, thereafter 50p per hour, pay on exit.

Needle and thread has been used for millennia for practical daily use but also to record events and personal stories. We are pleased to welcome back Denise North when she returns to give us a talk on Stitches in Time, apparently a talk that men find very interesting too.

History and sewing crosses centuries and continents telling the stories of men and women, societies, battles and working lives. People use stitches to make their voices heard even in desperate circumstances such as the sewing of soldiers in WW 1.

One famous story that springs easily to mind is the Bayeux Tapestry, stitched by anonymous people, it is political in nature, history belonging to the victors. (See Banner Image: Fleeing. Public domain)

Bayeux Tapestry Scene 1. Edward the Confessor, Harold 11. Public Domain

From beautiful mediaeval tapestries to Mary Queen of Scots stitching which was said to be treasonous, up to the banners used in Marches of the Trade Unions in the 19th and 20th centuries, demonstrating a variety of occupations, to religious banners and the Anti nuclear banners of the Greenham Common women.   Through craft and artistry we learn of protest, memory and identity.

Sewing needles were used as long ago as seventeen thousand BC made of bone and used to sew skin and furs for clothing and daily utility items. By 1200 buttons and button holes were becoming popular in Europe due to contact with other cultures in the Crusades. This driving force enabled the clothing industry to flourish in Europe. By 1730 Aachen in Germany (the burial place of Charlemagne) was the site of an early needle factory.

Mothers Union Banner, Belaugh, Norfolk. Attribution: Tecoates

Come along to the first talk of 2020 and see how it all holds together.

Stitches in time. Credit: Denise North

CAR PARKING: Please be aware that this is free for the first hour, thereafter 50p per hour, pay on exit.

 

 

Due to unforseen circumstances sadly ‘Betsy’ is unable to be with us on Tuesday. Lucky for us Maureen Roberts is able to perform ‘The Cream Cracker under the Settee’ from one of Alan Bennet’s Talking Head monologues. A role made popular by Thora Hird.

We also have other christmas jingles for you to celebrate the coming season. So please come and join us…

There will be refreshments including sherry and mince pie and Christmas songs.

Cost: Members £5.00    Non members £6.50

Parking in the Colne Rd. Car park. Please be aware this is only free for the first hour, thereafter it is 50p per hour, pay on exit.

Unfortunately this trip has had to be cancelled due to lack of numbers. We may run it at a later date. Keep your eye on the website next Spring.

Well, our Spring trip was a success so come and enjoy another  trip with the Friends, just over the border, to Halifax, home of Shibden Hall (as featured recently on television), a beautiful half timbered hall dating back to 1420.

Shibden Hall, Halfax. Attribution: Alexander P. Kapp

We will then go into Halifax in time for lunch and a visit to the recently restored Piece Hall, once  the centre of the Halifax cloth trade and the adjacent Calderdale Industrial Museum.

The Piece Hall, Halifax. Attribution: Ian Rutson

There will be plenty of time to explore the town and maybe visit the 12th century Minster (who would have thought that Halifax had a Minster!) before returning home in time for tea, or maybe tea and cream scones in Halifax!

Halifax Minster. Attribution: Michael Beckwith

The cost for the trip is £19.00 which includes the coach travel and entrance fees.  Please contact Georgina Bentley either by phone (01282 436369) or email(georgina.bentley@hotmail.co.uk) before 19th September 2019 to book your place. This should make for a really interesting day.

TIME… Approximately 9 30am – 4pm.  To be confirmed later.

Pick up point: To be confirmed later.

Banner Image: A merry bunch of day trippers last year in Hull. As you can see David is auditioning for the Pirates of Penzance. Attribution: Roger Grimshaw.

 

This will be the last gardening session of 2019, tidying up and bedding down the garden for winter.

The cafe will have some hearty warming soup or something more substantial.

Alireza Shakemia – Autumn is here

Wrap up warmly and come and join the gang.

Remember Abraham Lincoln?  well he had something to say about gardens “We can complain because rose bushes have thorns, or rejoice because thorn bushes have roses”.  A thorny issue then…

 

Banner Image: Park Hill, Pendle Heritage Centre

Its the season of mists and mellow fruitfulness, so the gardening gang will no doubt be tidying up and making the most of the plants that are still flowering.  There may be fruit to pick so come along and hopefully enjoy a good autumn day in the walled garden.

Autumn Flowers. Attribution: Sander van der Wel.

You might need to wrap up warm and you may want to bring your own packed lunch to eat in the garden or enjoy a hearty warm lunch in the cafe.

A weed is a plant that has mastered every survival skill except for learning how to grow in rows. – Doug Larson  

Banner Image: Brilliant orange Autumn colours contrasting with dull evergreens of the Eucalyptus. Accreditation: “Fir0002/Flagstaffotos”

Are you interested in:

Working outdoors in the fresh air?

Being amongst like minded people?

Working with your hands to nurture and improve the Heritage Centre garden?

Feeringbury Manor. Michaelmas Daisy. Attribution: Acabashi

Then come along 10 – 12 and meet the gang.   All equipment provided,  just bring your willingness and enthusiasm. Dress for the weather.

You might want to bring a packed lunch to eat in the garden or take advantage of some delicious food in the cafe.

 

Did you  know that “there are no gardening mistakes, only experiments”. – Janet Kilburn Phillips.

 The Friends of Pendle Heritage and Pendle Archaeology Group

Maps of prehistoric sites in the NW appear to show a void. Slowly the land is giving up its secrets and the work and findings of the speakers in this programme will challenge the accepted views of prehistory in the NW.   We have interesting sites and knowledgeable presenters on this our first Prehistory Study Day.

10.00am.  Rick Peterson: Introduction: Recent research on the Bronze Age in the North West

Abstract:  Our excavations at Fairy Holes Cave showed that the collared urn recovered by Musson in 1946 was part of an Early Bronze Age burial. At the Whitewell Enclosure radiocarbon evidence showed that the ditches and pits were in use at least from the Early Bronze Age and were still visible in the Later Bronze Age. The New Laund Enclosure, in contrast, has been shown to be Middle Iron Age. Both the enclosure ditch and the roundhouse in the centre of the enclosure have radiocarbon dates between 395 and 210 BC.

Rick Peterson

Profile: Rick is a Senior Lecturer in Archaeology at the University of Central Lancashire in Preston.

10.45   Kevin Grice: Warton Crag: Re-appraising an Iron Age Hill Fort

Abstract: Kevin will discuss recent research conducted with Morecambe Bay Partnership on the Iron Age hill fort on Warton Crag. By discussing both the antiquarian and twentieth-century documentary sources and evaluating the results of recent LiDAR imaging and contrasting the different views on the possible date and function of the monument including modern re-interpretations. Kevin will conclude that its dating may be more complex than previously thought and he will set out an alternative hypothesis and suggest further investigations.

Warton Crag IA Hillfort.
Attribution: Kevin Grice

Profile: Kevin is a Morecambe Bay Community Archaeology Volunteer, a member of the Lake District National Park Archaeology Network, Secretary of Kendal Historical & Archaeological Society and a member of the Council of the Cumberland & Westmorland Antiquarian and Archaeological Society. He has researched and excavated prehistoric, Roman, medieval and more modern industrial sites in Cumbria and Lancashire and has a particular interest in the prehistory of Cumbria and North Lancashire.

Also: Lidar video and display of Warton Hill in the foyer by Louise Martin,  H2H Cultural Heritage Officer, Morecambe Bay Partnership.

11.45     Debbie Hallam: Searching for Neolithic settlement in the Yorkshire Dales

Abstract: The Neolithic archaeology of the Yorkshire Dales is often difficult to unpick from the palimpsest of later habitation and land use and the identification of settlement of this period (4000-2500 cal. BC) is notoriously ephemeral. That it exists however is without question as evidenced by the abundant frequency of discrete surface finds of pottery and multi-period lithic artefacts collected over the years resulting in an assemblage comprising over 65000 pieces. Using the patterns of distribution of material culture as primary evidence for settlement, it is possible to see the Upper Wharfe Valley as a focal area for small Neolithic groups following a pastoral lifestyle supplemented by hunting and gathering.Recent excavation of an Early Neolithic house near Grassington indicates a more settled existence in Wharfedale as early as 3650 cal. BC and the discovery of two Late Neolithic-Bronze Age Henges in the Wharfe Valley add support for an expanding community adhering to monumental building styles seen beyond the area.

Macehead from Langcliffe, near Kettlewell. Attribution: D. Hallam

Using Upper Wharfedale as a focal point for the discussion of evidence for Neolithic presence, comparisons will be made with areas of archaeological interest at the periphery of the Dales such as Nidderdale, Wensleydale and the Inglebrough massif.

DH @ Scargill, near Conistone. Attribution: D. Hallam

Profile: Debbie is a mature student and has gained a BA (Hons) and MPhil from the University of Bradford where she has specialised in the research of prehistoric pottery. Her MPhil comprised a study of over 250 Early Bronze Age Funerary Cups from northern Britain and her interest in the Neolithic and Early Bronze Age periods and a love of the Yorkshire Dales landscape has resulted in her current PhD project at Bradford University.

 

13.30   Dr. Kevin Cootes: Illuminating Lowland Iron Age Border Settlement in North-West England: The Poulton Research Project

Abstract: Lowland North-West England is not traditionally a region which occupies the minds of researchers investigating the British Iron Age. A review of the national literature suggests few identified sites, low population density and little social stratification. In spite of the presence of multiple hillforts and local specialist research this view prevails, but is it accurate? Archaeological investigations at Poulton in Cheshire have revealed a settlement which challenges such models, comprising roundhouse gullies spanning eight centuries of habitation. The accompanying material assemblage is characteristic of status, with burial, industrial activity and ritual practices all represented. The site was ideal due to its position adjacent to the River Dee, overlooking a defensible floodplain which enabled a mixed farming regime. Additionally, water-courses often served as boundaries between tribal entities. The overall results have the potential to serve as a type site, revealing similar settlements and illuminating the Iron Age in North-West England.

Profile:  Kevin is a Consultant Archaeologist for the Poulton Research Project and Senior Researcher at Liverpool John Moores University.

14.15  Dr Sam Walsh:  Bronze Age burials in and around Lancashire

Ear Plug from Whitelow. Attribution: Sam Walsh

Abstract:   Our understanding of prehistoric burial practices in the UK is predisposed/biased towards areas where there have been a high frequency of modern excavations and research activities. This has led to gaps in archaeological data which have been interpreted as lack of activity in some areas, or this lack is acknowledged but not addressed. In comparison to adjacent regions such as Cumbria and Yorkshire, little is known of Bronze Age and other prehistoric burials in Lancashire and the wider North West due to a lack of modern excavations and high levels of past industrialisation in this area. I will talk about the results of my research on the Bronze Age burials of Lancashire and around.

This will include discussion of burial practices, grave goods, demography, health and disease from sites including Whitelow, Astley Hall, and Pendleton.

Profile:  Sam is from Preston and completed her PhD at the University of Central Lancashire. This was a study of human remains from Bronze Age burial sites in northern England. Since then she has continued work on Bronze Age remains in Lancashire through excavation of a site near Morecambe and also through recent analysis of human remains held at Lancashire Museum stores and Astley Hall. Sam has worked in UK field archaeology and is currently working on Neolithic human remains from Iraqi Kurdistan as part of a project with the University of Reading.

Burial Urn. Whitelow. Attribution: Sam Walsh

 

15.30  Mike Woods:  Water Meetings Iron Age Hill Fort and Landscape Surveys around Pendle

Abstract: Mike carried out a number of surveys across Pendle and the surrounding landscape between 2015 and 2019, the results of which discovered that the site of Watermeetings is a large Iron Age hillfort. Mike will present this discovery alongside the results of landscape survey across Pendle, which shows evidence for how the ancestors lived and used the landscape towards the end of the prehistoric period.

Profile: Mike Woods is a Landscape Archaeologist,Geophysicist and Prehistorian based in Lancashire. His research has focused on prehistoric sites across the North of England and Wales, including the henge landscape of Northumberland, Neolithic passage tombs and stone circles on Anglesey and Bronze Age burial monuments, Iron Age hillforts and a 17th century witches house at Pendle near Lancashire.

Catherine Rousseau Jones: Excavation on Calf Hill above Sabden on the flanks of Pendle Hill

Abstract:Following initial surveys in 2018,  Pendle Archaeology Group’s current excavations on Calf Hill above Sabden are revealing some interesting discoveries. Although initial studies suggested medieval origins for the site, further investigations have revealed much older occupation.

 

Profile: Catherine  completed a degree in Archaeology at the University of York and is a voluntary archaeologist and Chair of Pendle Archaeology Group.

Close at 16.10

Banner Image this page: Lancashire, Early BA flat axes. Attribution: Portable Antiquities Scheme. Ian Richardson.

Banner Image Page 3: Mid bronze-age cremation urn, found in Roxton Bedfordshire. In the stores of Bedford Museum. Courtesy of Simon Speed. In the public domain.

Image this page; Digging on Calf Hill 2019. Attribution: Roger Grimshaw

Layout: Apologies, Gremlins at work!

 

 

Where:   The Barn, Pendle Heritage Centre, 2 Colne Rd. Barrowford BB9 6JQ

Fee:          £18 with lunch     £12 Study Day   Students £10 with lunch (in full time education)

                   Includes Tea/coffee and biscuits on arrival

Programme

9.30 – 9.55                Coffee and registration

9.55 – 10.00             Welcome

10.00 – 10.45           Recent research on the Bronze Age in the North west.    Rick Peterson

10.45 – 11.30            Warton Crag Iron Age hill fort.     Kevin Grice

11.30 – 11.45             Short break

11.45 – 12.30            Searching for Neolithic settlement in the Yorkshire Dales.   Debbie Hallam

12.30 – 13.30            Lunch

13.30 – 14.15             Iron Age settlement at Poulton Cheshire.    Dr. Kevin Cootes

14.15 – 15.00             Bronze Age Burials in and around Lancashire.    Dr. Sam Walsh

15.00 – 15.15             Short break

15.15 – 16.10              Iron Age settlement at Water Meetings and Landscape Survey of the Pendle

                                     Landscape.    Mike Woods.

                                     Excavation of Calf Hill, Sabden.   Catherine Rousseau Jones

16.10                          Close of event

PARKING                 Free for first hour, then 50p per hour, pay on exit.  

There will be some roadside parking. The car park is immediately left next to the bridge as you approach the Heritage Centre from Barrowford.   Please contact us re disabled parking spaces.   As lunch will be served upstairs, contact us if you need any assistance.

Banner Image: Axe head. Attribution: Debbie Hallam

Layout: Apologies, Gremlins at work!

 

 

 

 

 

The Friends of Pendle Heritage and Pendle Archaeology Group

Booking and Payment       Download Form

Where: The Barn, Pendle Heritage Centre, 2 Colne Rd. Barrowford BB9 6JQ

Fee: £18 with lunch £12 Study Day Students £10 with lunch (in full time education)

Includes Tea/Coffee biscuits on arrival

Programme

9.30 – 9.55 Coffee and registration

9.55 – 10.00 Welcome

10.00 – 10.45 Recent Research on the Bronze Age in the North West. Rick Peterson

10.45 – 11.30 Warton Crag Iron Age Hill Fort. Kevin Grice

11. 30 – 11. 45 Short break

Please reserve …… place/s with lunch (£18)

Meat and potato – indicate number ………………

Cheese and onion – indicate number………………

Please reserve ……. place/s without lunch (£12)

Please reserve ……. student place/s (£10) with lunch (must be in full time education, state school or college)

Meat and potato – indicate number ………………  Cheese and onion – indicate number………………

TOTAL COST……………….

Via BACS       Sort Code:   01-05-93 Account No:   02224526

Re the reference please put SDay and your first initial and as much of your last name as will fit in the reference box as possible. Then please e mail info@foph.co.uk  to let us know you have paid and include a contact tel. no. and also indicate number of lunches. Thankyou.

OR

 To pay by Cheque

Please make payable to:     Friends of Pendle Heritage

 Name/s…………………………………………………………………………………………

Contact address………………………………………………………………………………………………………

…………………………………………………………………………Postcode………………

Contact telephone number/s…………………………………………………………

…………………………………………………..

(May be used to contact you if there are any changes in venue etc)

E mail address……………………………………………………………………….

Download Form here also…

https://www.foph.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/08/Booking-and-Payment-version-4docxnew-1-e1565806920820.jpg

Please return this form to:   The Treasurer, FoPH, Pendle Heritage Centre, Park Hill, 2 Colne Rd. Barrowford. BB9 6JQ and put Study Day on the envelope. Thankyou.

 

PARKING                  Free for first hour, then 50p per hour, pay on exit.   There will be some

                                     roadside parking. The car park is immediately left after  the bridge as  you  approach the Heritage Centre       from Barrowford – opposite the centre.

 

                                     Please contact us re disabled parking spaces. As lunch will be served

                                     upstairs, contact us if you need any assistance.

                                     Any enquiries contact info@foph.co.uk

Layout:     Apologies – Gremlins at work!